STEM Central

A Community of Practice for NSF STEM Projects

Wednesday, March 5th. 2014

Information Description Resource

6:30-8:30pm

Thurgood Marshall West

Pre-Conference Open Forum

Topic: STEPping into the Future: Sustaining STEP's Mission in the New Funding Landscape.

With the suspension of STEP and the implementation of IUSE, this is a critical time to reflect upon what we have learned from implementing STEP projects, and use this collective knowledge to guide future decisions. At this session we will have a facilitated conversation to identify vital features of STEP we have found to be essential to the success of our projects, features that we would like to see sustained and strongly supported in the future.The outcome will be a framework for a white paper or document that compiles our collective best practices from STEP and makes recommendations for future funding priorities. 

To help us in planning, we ask that you register for this session if you are planning to attend. Note that registration for this session is separate from the meeting registration. Please click here and fill out this simple form to register.

Working Group

6:00-9:00pm

Thurgood Marshall Foyer

Registration

6:00-9:00pm

Exhibit Hall C

Poster Setup

Working Group

Thursday, March 6th. 2014

Information Description Resource

7:00-8:15am

Exhibit Hall C

Poster Setup

Working Group

7:00am-5:00pm

Thurgood Marshall Foyer

Registration

7:30-8:15am

Taylor

New Grantees' Meeting

Connie Della-Piana, STEP Lead Program Director, DUE, NSF
Dan Udovic & Tania Siemens, University of Oregon, STEP Central

7:30-8:15am

Thurgood Northwest

Continental Breakfast

11:30am-7:00pm

Table by Registration

ICF International Inc. Help Desk

8:15-10:00am

Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Opening Session

Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Opening Remarks and Meeting Information

Connie Della-Piana, STEP Lead Program Director, DUE, NSF
José Herrera, Western New Mexico University,  Meeting co-Organizer

Speaker: Susan Singer, Director, Division of Undergraduate Education, NSF

Working Group

Title

Improving Undergraduate STEM Education One STEP at a Time

Abstract:

From news items on the disruptive force of MOOCs to White House Datajams and Datapaloozas to expert-informed national reports, we are collectively being challenged to rethink and improve the college learning experience. The NRC’s Discipline-based Education Research report baselines the state of research on learning and understanding in science and engineering and the Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development pushes towards coherence and impact in growing the evidence base. Yet the gap between research and implementation remains a challenge.  STEP grantees have integrated a range of evidence-based practices and research to explore ways to enhance persistence and retention, building the STEM talent pool.  This continues to be an emphasis in NSF's new program description, Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE), which aims to substantively change the quality of undergraduate STEM education.

Plenary Speaker: Jo Handelsman, Howard Hughes Medical Institute professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology at Yale University

Introduction of Speaker: Susan Singer, Director, Division of Undergraduate Education, NSF

Working Group

Title:

STEM Education for the 21st Century

Abstract:

Jobs in many of the most rapidly expanding sectors of the U.S. economy require technical training and scientific thinking.  And yet, despite students’ concerns about employment after college, the production of STEM college graduates is not keeping pace. The United States is predicted to have a deficit of 1 million college graduates with degrees in STEM fields over the next decade.  As the 2012 report, “Engage to Excel” from the President’s Council of Advisors for Science and Technology observed, the most cost-effective and feasible way to increase the number of STEM graduates is to retain the best students who start college with an interest in STEM fields.  Currently, 60% of those who start college majoring in STEM graduate with a degree in another field, and many of these are top performers in the introductory STEM courses.  We must do better.  Research evidence suggests that by changing our classroom practices, implementing research experiences for first- and second-year college students, and offering mentoring and peer groups that enable students to form scientific identities, we can stem the tide and retain sufficient majors to meet the country’s workforce needs.  Changing demographics require that, as we restructure our curricula, we pay attention to equity.  To retain students from all demographic groups, we need to grapple with the insidious effects of implicit bias, which undermines good intentions and sound instructional innovations.  Research evidence tells us what to do.  Now we need to act.

10:00-10:30am

Thurgood Marshall Foyer

Networking Break

Coffee, Tea, Decaf

10:30-12:00pm

Breakout Session I

Location Description
I-1 Continue the Discussion with Keynote Speaker Jo Handelsman
I-2 Working with Learning Analytics Data: Basics that Can Inform Your STEP Project
I-3 Effective Practices for Recruiting and Retaining Minorities and Women in STEM
I-4 How to Implement an Early Alert and Intervention Program to Improve Student Success and Retention
I-5 Activities and Measures for Critical Elements of a Truly Functioning 2Y/4Y Pipeline to STEM Baccalaureate Degrees
I-6 Interdisciplinary Mathematics in STEM Education: Undergraduate Retention and Research
I-7 Faculty Learning Communities: A Tool for Engaging Faculty in your STEP Project
I-8 Teaching Flipped!
I-9 Bridge Programs
I-10 Encouraging Student Participation
I-11 Improving Student Success in Foundational Courses in Math
I-12 Designing and Conducting an Evaluation of Your Project that Meets NSF Expectations

12:00-1:50pm

Thurgood Northwest

Lunch and Networking

Lunch Speaker: Joan Ferrini-Mundy, Assistant Director, Education and Human Resources Directorate, NSF

Indroduction of Speaker: Susan Singer, Director, Division of Undergraduate Education, NSF

Title:

Fastforwarding Improvement in Undergraduate STEM Education

Abstract:

A diverse and globally engaged U.S. science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce, able to innovate and well prepared for the changing scientific landscape, is crucial to the national health and economy. The STEP program investments are aimed at increasing the number of  well prepared STEM graduates. The challenge of implementing the promising practices you all have developed more broadly remains. So does the need to build a robust knowledge base on learning, learning environments, broadening participation, and developing a quality STEM workforce.  There are great opportunities in today’s dynamic context of emerging areas of science, new technologies for learning and doing science, and big data. Across NSF and the Federal government, efforts are underway to coordinate and integrate education research and development investments for greater impact, including improving evaluation efforts.  The Federal STEM Education 5-Year Strategic Plan provides a roadmap.  The STEP community stands to play a leading role and we will discuss the opportunities.

2:00-3:00pm

Exhibit Hall C

Poster Session A

Working Group

3:00-4:00pm

Exhibit Hall C

Poster Session B

Working Group

4:00-4:15pm

Thurgood Marshall Foyer

Networking Break

(coffee, tea & decaf)

4:15-5:45pm

Breakout Session II

Location Description
II-1 Strategies for dissemination and publication of results
II-2 Sustaining and Institutionalizing Best Practices Identified in Your STEP Project
II-3 Creating a Community through Evaluation: STEP Evaluation FAQ's and Helpful Resources
II-4 Resources to improve your Undergraduate Research and Internship Program
II-5 Improving Student Success in Foundational Courses in the Sciences
II-6 Undergraduate Research - Implementation in the Community College
II-7 Strategies for implementing Structured Support Systems for Underrepresented Students
II-8 Don’t Reinvent the Wheel: Partners and Strategies to Effectively Manage Your STEP Project
II-9 Peer Mentoring Programs
II-10 Fostering Changes in institutional Culture and Practice
II-11 Learning Communities and Cohort Building
II-12 Roundtable for Type 2 and STEP Centers projects

5:45-7:00pm

Exhibit Hall C

Reception & Networking

(Refreshments; Hors Doevres; Cash Bar)

Friday, March 7th. 2014

Information Description Resource

7:15am-12:00pm

Thurgood Marshall Foyer

Registration

7:15-8:00am

Thurgood Northwest

Continental Breakfast

8:00am-12:00pm

Table by Registration

ICF International Inc. Help Desk

8:00-9:30am

Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Plenary Session

Plenary Speaker: Vincent Tinto, Distinguished University Professor Emeritus, Syracuse University

Introduction of Speaker: Kelly Mack, Vice President, American Association of Colleges and Universities; Director, Project Kaleidoscope

Working Group

Title:

Student Success Does Not Arise by Chance

Abstract:

Student success does not arise by chance. Nor is it solely a reflection of good intentions. It requires a series of coordinated actions that are coherently structured, systematic in nature, and are proactive in application. Professor Tinto describes a range of such actions and provides concrete examples of how they are applied to ensure that students to succeed in college. As importantly, he speaks to the steps programs need take to ensure that those actions endure and are scaled-up over time.

9:30-10:00am

Thurgood Marshall Foyer

Networking Break

(coffee, tea & decaf)

10:00-11:30am

Breakout Session III

Location Description
III-1 Continue the Discussion with keynote speaker Vincent Tinto
III-2 STEPWork: A Workshop on Sustainability of STEP Grants through Workforce Board Collaboration
III-3 How to Work With an Evaluator on a STEM Education Project: Maximizing Benefits and Minimizing Costs
III-4 Study Design, Data Collection and Dissemination of Results
III-5 Strategies That Enhance the Success of Peer-Assisted Learning/PLTL Programs
III-6 Using Mini-Grants to Increase Sustainability, Faculty Buy-in, and Institutionalization
III-7 Developing a STEM Faculty Mentor Training Program
III-8 Getting Back on Track! Strategies for Overcoming a Slow Start and Re-engaging the Campus Community
III-9 Would You Say That if You Knew…Addressing Inclusive Language on Campus
III-10 Learning Communities 101 or 401
III-11 Assessing Transfer Students at 4 Year Institutions
III-12 Improving Student Success in Foundational Courses in Math

11:30-11:55am

Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Closing Session

Speaker: Connie Della-Piana, STEP Lead Program Director, DUE, NSF

Title:

STEP: Past, Present, and Future

11:55am

Meeting Adjourns